Things You Want Know Before Building Wooden Garden Sheds

25
December

A wooden garden shed can provide you with many benefits. Many homeowners consider building their own garden shed to store garden tools, landscaping equipment and other supplies. Some will also use this building for a safe environment to establish seedlings before moving them outdoors. A garden shed may be larger or smaller in size, and it can add function and convenience alike to your gardening experience. Before you start building your own garden shed, however, there are a few things you should consider fully.

The Need for a Construction Permit
Many municipalities require homeowners to obtain a construction or building permit before adding a structure to their property. Depending on the size of your shed and where you live, this may not be required. However, if you build a shed in an area where a construction or building permit is required and without getting that required permit, the city or municipality could require you to remove it from your property. You may invest a lot of time, sweat and money into building your shed, so you do want to ensure your building plans comply with local laws.

The Type of Shed
If you only have plans to use your shed for storing lawn and gardening equipment and tools, a basic shed without insulation, electricity, water and more may be acceptable. You may not even need to install a window if the shed will be used for a basic storage purpose. However, if you are storing items that need to be kept at a steady temperature, insulation and possibly climate control capabilities may be required. If you will be using your shed to store extra large equipment, such as a riding lawn mower, you may need a double-wide door along with an entrance ramp. It may be necessary to have a pass-through experience with doors on opposite ends of the shed. If the shed will be used to raise seedlings, ample natural lighting with the installation of windows coupled with a sink for easier watering may be useful. You want your shed to conveniently meet all of your needs, so picking out the best shed plans possible is key.

The Location
Any time you build a new structure on your property, you want to consider the location carefully. This is even more true when building a wooden garden shed. Keep in mind that a structure will need to be placed in a relatively flat area without an incline. If you choose an area with an incline, this area will need to be leveled so that you can build on a flat surface. It should also be an area that is not prone to flooding or developing pools of standing water during wet times as a wooden shed could rot when exposed to significant water over time. Further, the contents inside the shed could be damaged.

The Cost
Many homeowners debate between building their own shed from scratch, often using do-it-yourself plans found online, and installing a pre-fabricated shed on their property. It can be difficult to fully estimate the cost of building a shed on your own from scratch. To start, you will need to find the right plans to utilize. The best plans include a list of all of the materials and tools you will need for the job. You can take this list to the local home improvement store, locate the items and calculate the cost. Keep in mind that any tools required will either need to be leased or purchased. In most cases, it is more affordable to build your own shed from plans found online.

Building your own wooden garden shed is not something that you want to undertake without diligent planning. It is wise to spend ample time finding the perfect location for the shed in your yard and researching the need to apply for a building permit. While you wait for your building permit to be approved, you can gather the needed supplies and materials for the project. Most sheds can be completed with a few days of diligent effort, but some may require you to work on them over the course of several weekends.

This post was written by

jasonjason – who has written posts on Home Tips Plus.
I'm a father of three, married and a home owner since 2006. I've worked in fixing up homes and rental properties.

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