Don’t Be That Parent That Loses Your Child in Public

22
July

Most parents believe that they could never lose their child in a public setting. Even at a busy amusement park, shopping center or public pool, parents rely on their own instincts for keeping track of their children. Yet for anyone who has ever come close to losing their little one, the feeling can be all too real. It is always easy to judge the mom or dad who loses their child in public, but the reality of it is that it can happen to anyone within a matter of seconds. It is only natural for curious children to wander off and for parents to become sidetracked. Depending on the age of your child, he or she may not even know an address or phone number to contact you.

So what can parents do to ensure that they are not the next faces seen on the news for losing track of their children? Fortunately, there are plenty of ways to ensure that this does not happen, no matter where your family is adventuring for the day. First and foremost, hold your child’s hand. It is simple and perfect for toddlers and preschoolers who still have a willingness to stay close to mom and dad. Start young as well; if you teach your toddler how to walk into the grocery store holding your hand and praise him or her for a job well done, your little one will know what is expected.

Second, dress your child in bright colors or have the whole family in matching colors. This works best for a planned activity and makes it easy to spot everyone. Yet even for those regular errands, dress your child in something that will stand out and be remembered, such as a big bow or a straw hat. Not only is this an excellent way to locate your child if he or she strays, but your child is less likely to be abducted wearing items that are easily noticeable and remembered.

Finally, adopt a buddy system if you are venturing out with a group of children. Of course, this only works in age-appropriate situations, but buddy systems work great and give children the bit of freedom they need while still keeping safe. Always locate a place to go if your child does become lost, such as the help desk at a grocery store or the front check out at the library. Make sure that your child knows his or her address, phone number and parents’ names. Getting this information out quickly will ensure that your child will be located to you as soon as possible.

While these simple and effective steps work great in public settings and reduce the risk that your child will be lost, they are also best case scenarios. Parents know all too well that kids don’t always hold hands, remember their full address or are wearing bright clothes and accessories. Fortunately, there are plenty of inexpensive tools that ensure your child’s safety so that once again, you don’t become that parent with the wandering child.

Child wrist leashes attach your child to you using a strap or leash. They are attached to the child with a harness and cost less than $10. Since many parents don’t feel comfortable using wrist leashes, a backpack leash is a great alternative. A cute backpack is worn on the child’s back and the parent holds the leash. The backpack also comes in the form of a harness so your child cannot slip out from underneath.

Besides leashes, there are also child locators. These electronic devices are wireless and consist of two pieces; one that the child wears and one that the parent keeps. If your child wanders off, simply press the button and an alert will be sounded off, making it easy to locate your child and ward off any potential abductors. Although more expensive, a GPS watch is a great tool for older children. The watch cannot be taken off without your knowledge and it allows you to set safe zones for your child. Always make sure that an ID card is kept with your children to alert others of who they are and where they live.

This post was written by

jasonjason – who has written posts on Home Tips Plus.
I'm a father of three, married and a home owner since 2006. I've worked in fixing up homes and rental properties.

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